Move fast and break things: How to get your B2B content marketing program up and running in no time.

facebook-the-hacker-way-poster-680x489As most content marketers, and social media marketers too, are painfully aware, the biggest issue these days (and years) is to create meaningful, sharable content that engages the audiences and nurture them in order to improve their lifetime customer value.

My take on it is that it doesn’t have to be neither hard nor expensive.

The key is to identify potential content creators, engage with them and motivate them to share and produce content that’s valuable for both your audiences and your company. This content can be everything from ultra short-form (IGs, tweets etc.) over short-form (blog posts, videos etc.) to long-form (whitepapers, e-books etc.).

On top of that you need to be lean (“lean is fun” was my mantra at Maersk Line), experiment, and steal and grab whatever you can, wherever you can.

Today, companies need to think, not like publishers, but like publishing start-ups, as Ryan Skinner of Forrester Research argues in a brilliant post on the Velocity Partners’ blog.

The first step, I feel, is to map out your (potential) content infrastructure plus understand the many different content forms being consumed today.

Therefore, I made below slide deck, mapping out the basics, analyzing content forms by ability to engage and convince, and making it a bit clearer (at least to me) when to “grab and steal” and when to pay agencies to produce content.

I hope it makes sense. Please post a comment to let me know what you think.

[slideshare id=29179042&doc=contentinfrastructurejonathanwich13dec2013-131213073021-phpapp02]
PS: The header and the title was deliberately stolen from the above mentioned post by Ryan Skinner on the Velocity Partners’ blog.

1 thought on “Move fast and break things: How to get your B2B content marketing program up and running in no time.”

  1. Hi Jonathan,
    Great to see you continuing to provide direction for aspiring content marketers and social sellers like myself. What has been your experience in countering people in higher management who do not appreciate the value of social selling and content marketing in the organisation? How did you convince them in going ahead with your plans?

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