The Top 12 Brands on Facebook: How Good Are They Really?

In Maersk Line, we’re in the process of rolling out the use of Facebook to our global organisation, meaning that the more than 150 country communication managers situated in offices around the globe are now able to do local posts via our global Facebook page (Facebook.com/MaerskLine).

In doing so, I discovered a need from their end to better measure how good their posts are. Since they are only posting to a limited audience of e.g. 5,000 fans in their country it might be that 30 likes is extremely good – even though it doesn’t feel that way.

Therefore, I started looking into how you can calculate how good – or successful – a post is, and I ‘developed’ an engagement score and started calculating the score for 12 of what’s usually seen as the best brands in social media. Just to have something to benchmark our efforts against.

The Social Media Brand Engagement Score on Facebook

What I did was this: I took the average number of likes, shares and comments for the 10 most recent global posts for the different Facebook pages – and multiplied the comments and the shares with 4 and 2 respectively because they are worth more than a simple like.

I then divided that average post score with the total number of fans and multiplied it by 10,000 to get a more regular number… and that’s the score. Quite simple.

You might argue against the metrics behind this score in a number of ways, but I think it gives a good and clear overall picture of how good companies really are at social. And it’s very easy to use to calculate how well you (as a social media manager) are performing.

The result

The outcome of the survey is also quite interesting. Here it is, without any further comments:

Lego                  48.0*
Disney               34.2
GE                     32.9
Shell                  19.1
Ford                   17.2
McDonald’s       10.2
Oreo                   7.2
Dell                     7.0
Red Bull              6.0
Converse            5.1**
Starbucks           4.5
Coca-Cola          2.2

Oh, and did I forget to mention that Maersk Line’s score is quite, quite uplifting for us? We scored 37.0

– – –

* = two of the posts had suspiciously many more likes (not shares and comments) than the rest, suggesting they were ‘bought’, i.e. promoted through FB Adverts.

** = if not for a single, very popular post the score would only have been 1.3.

Jay Baer & Scott Stratten: “Just be awesome!”

ImageOk, right as I had promised myself (and my very few readers) that I would stop doing self-promotional scrapbook-like blog posts, I stumbled upon this podcast where Jay Baer and Scott Stratten (both top 5 social media influencers according to various rankings) start talking about Maersk Line, social media and… me.

You can listen to the podcast here – it’s right at the end.

Or you can just read along on this page, because this is the transcript of the part of the podcast I’m talking about:

Scott: Yeah, I have a couple of good guys out there. Really one that has fascinated me, the one in Denmark is a shipping line called Maersk.

Jay: They were on the Social Pros podcast, Maersk Lines.

Scott: That’s how I learned about them.

Jay: See how it works. It’s circular.

Scott: That’s how much I love it. If you haven’t listened to that podcast, listen to it.

Jay: We’ll link it up.

Scott: I phoned the guy. I phoned him in Denmark and said, “You need to talk to me right now and tell me how the hell you did this.”

Jay: He’s great.

Scott: You’re a container shipping line. Go listen to that podcast. If you guys could link to it, that would be perfect for the guys.

Jay: We’ll do it.

Scott: Look at what they’re doing, and it’s one of those things where I’m saying when you’re industry is know as not being awesome, it’s the best time to be there, because nobody else is doing it.

Jay: Talk about shattering expectations.

Scott: Go do it. Please check them out. You’ll do yourself a favor. Look at how they get likes and they get community, but they understand that social media is about being social, and it’s one guy.

Jay: One of the best Instagram programs I’ve ever seen too.

Scott: Twenty hours a week is total of what they do. There are 100,000 employees. A million people recognize the brand. One guy. You can do something like that. Just be awesome.

Jay: Fantastic. Anything else?

Scott: No, that’s good.

Jay: All right.

Scott: Let’s stick with Denmark for now.

Jay: Fantastic. As a quarter Danish, I appreciate your shout-out and thank you very much. Always good to see you. This will do it for Episode 19 of Social Pros.

The Maersk Line in social media story once again… interview in TradeWinds

ImageOn Friday 8 June, TradeWinds – one of the leading trade publications – told the story about Maersk Line in social media. The week before, they called me up couple of times, a bit surprised by the fact that Maersk Line has started to engage through social media to the extent that we have.

You can read the article on The Last Mile Blog.

PS: To be honest, this blog is becoming a bit too self-promoting, which is not the intention, really. I hereby promise myself to do less of these scrapbook-like blog posts.

Maersk Line in social media: A webinar with spotONvision

Last Tuesday, on 5 June 2012, I presented the “Maersk Line in social media” case on a webinar hosted by spotONvision, the company behind the B2B Marketing Forum in Amsterdam.

You can read/browse through the presentation here, if you (or anyone) should find it interesting.

Why 300,000 fans on Facebook could turn out to be worthless

Mark Zuckerberg on stage, talking about engagement.
But just how engaging is Facebook really?
(Image credit: news.cnet.com).

(This blog post was originally published on Maersk Line’s intranet)

By Jonathan Wichmann, Head of Social Media, Maersk Line

People just can’t help themselves. The crowds are cheering. The media is telling the story (even the shipping press). Experts are using it as a best practice case. It’s even in the Mærsk Post.

In short, everyone (almost) I meet tells me how amazing it is.

I’m of course talking about social media.

Of course, I appreciate all this attention and enthusiasm. But we risk missing the point if we focus too hard on the numbers.

Why? Because social media is not just about being popular and getting attention. Having a lot of fans is valuable (and it means that we prioritise our social media interactions), but the real value (for the business) of social media has to do with high quality engagement.

The value of social media

In theory, the value of one interaction can be worth more than 300,000 likes on Facebook.

Let me give you an example:

On LinkedIn we’ve created a group called ‘The Shipping Circle’. Here, we’ve invited shipping experts to join discussions about the future of the industry.

Some of the members have written long and very insightful posts about what we could do next in order to remain at the top of the shipping game.

What I’m trying to say is that it is a real possibility that just one single good idea from here could turn out to be worth millions, if not billions, of dollars.

Compare this to the value of a ‘like’ on Facebook.

It’s a way of thinking

For a company like ours social media creates most value when it challenges the way we think and interact. In fact, social media is a mindset, a way of thinking and working together. It’s based on the fact that we are social animals, and that means we can only benefit from sharing our thoughts and ideas with each other.

This leads me to the most brilliant part of social media: it doesn’t discriminate. The housebound and the shy are as visible as the active and the outspoken. Even those who are not very social in real life can share their thoughts too.

Maersk Line can definitely benefit from this. Time will tell when and where.

Instagram Lessons from a Giant B2B Company: Interview on Convince & Convert

This is an oldie by now: A couple of months ago I was interviewed by Jay Baer and Eric Boggs for an episode of Convince & Convert‘s Social Pros podcasts, a series where they basically talk to frontline social media people to get a hands-on perspective of the social media world.

You can listen to the interview here. Or download it here.

Some of @MaerskLine’s own instagrams side-by-side. Screendump from Flickr.

In short, they were impressed by the huge following Maersk Line has gained in a few months (e.g. 174,000 fans on Facebook at that point in time), and I explained the background of our social media engagement and the many different things we hope to achieve through our different social media channels.

Among other things, I explained about the visual track in our programme using Instagram and  Facebook and encouraging users to take photos of ships and containers and share them. That’s how the podcast got its title.

Data-driven or human? You can be both.

Combining data and bright ideas. It can be done. Photo: screendump from crispsocial.com.

Social media managers today can be divided into two groups (roughly speaking, of course):

1. Those who stick to hard metrics and let data determine their decisions.

2. Those who trust their intuition and just go ahead and post what they feel is right.

So what group do you belong to? Well, you should belong to both.

Out of the blue comes… nothing

As written earlier, if you apply social science and the concept of ‘social creativity‘ it becomes evident that you cannot be successful in social if you cannot perform social creativity, i.e. if you’re not capable of adding something new (that’s the creative part) and value adding to the social group you’re engaging with.

However, social creativity very rarely adds value if it’s not rooted in the a firm understanding of the behaviour and history of that social group.

The conclusion?

This leads to a very clear conclusion about what social media managers should do in order to be successful:

1. Use metrics, data, theory and  knowledge to give you a firm understanding, and keep measuring so you can get even wiser down the road – but don’t use data to decide what you post, when you post it etc.

Data should be used to review the past.

2. Make sure to maintain an explorative, improvisational and authentic approach on a day-to-day basis, and try to avoid setting up very tangible, quantitative goals for the performance of your social media programme – in a social game, it’s just not right to judge a success only by the numbers.

The human touch, the intuition should guide the now, i.e. content creation and the actual posting (don’t pre-plan any posts!).

The more long-term, strategic decisions (the future) should be based on a combination of the two.

Then again…

That being said, I realise that there are quite big differences between brands and industries.

For instance, in a start-up phase in social you don’t have much data and will tend to put more weight on the explorative part.

But when quantity and data is in place, the mode will likely – or should – shift to a more data-driven approach – even on a day-to-day level (again, depending on the brand and the strategy).

Scott Stratten about Maersk Line’s social media efforts

Not the worst kind of feedback you can get. Scott Stratten heard Jay Baer’s interview with me on Convince & Convert and phoned me up to get more input because he wanted to talk about the Maersk Line case in his keynote at the B2B Marketing Forum in Amsterdam, 20 March 2012.

[vimeo http://www.vimeo.com/39774141 w=500&h=281]

 

“Social creativity” vs. ROI: Why hard metrics don’t matter in social media

Miles Davis is a good example of social creativity. Not only was he one of the greatest improvisers in his field, he had an innate ability to reinvent himself throughout his career.

When embarking on social media most companies ask themselves: “What do we get out of this? What’s the ROI? And how do we measure it?”

While this kind of thinking seems reasonable, and quite logical too, I believe it also poses a big problem for most companies, not least B2B companies where an actual conversion is often far away.

Actually, I have reason to believe that today hard metrics are hampering at least every second B2B social media programme around the world. Why? Because hard metrics force the companies down a path that’s too rigid and focused on short-term success.

While the discussion of what success means in a social context is often neglected social media managers end up navigating according to hard metrics with limited ability to manoeuver and be creative, i.e. find new ways that add value.

Writing the script as we go along

Let’s backtrack a bit and ask ourselves what kind of rules or logic we should apply when engaging in social media: Is it business rules or social rules?

The answer is evident: Business rules don’t apply. Social media is about the users connecting, and companies rely on the users’ mercy.

So it must be social rules then, right?

No, not really. Because there are no rules for how to be social. As Darwin taught us, the world is changing constantly, and we as human beings therefore need to improvise, not least when it comes to being social.

We need to write the manuscript as we go along.

Social creativity

This goes to tell that there’s a basic creativity aspect in our lives: We’re creating the social in every now, and we need to be creative in order to be successful in social life.

Translating this into a company’s social media engagement means that creativity and ability to improvise is necessary in order to engage successfully. Plans and measurements only make sense insofar they improve our ability to perform “social creativity”.

Here, creativity doesn’t mean something strange or even mad. It’s something we all do. Creativity is when we create something new that adds value in the given situation or context.

An end in itself

You might even claim that “social creativity” is the true engine behind the progress of mankind. Our social nature and structure is what has made us successful (“we did it together”), and being social is therefore an end in itself.

In other words, the ultimate goal with any social media campaign must ‘simply’ be to create new and better ways to be social. And in that scheme of things soft (qualitative) metrics are much more valuable than the hard (quantitative) ones.

An article by J. Boye about, well, my work for Maersk Line.

Last week I was phoned up by Janus Boye who is the CEO and founder J. Boye “the international community for web & internet professionals”. In other words, a quite influential blogger on things like internet and not least social media.

Maybe it’s due to the fact that Janus is a Dane, but he had nevertheless noticed the recent success of Maersk Line within social media. And he found it to be interesting and even surprising, given the fact that Maersk Line is a B2B company in a quite conservative industry. The background being that B2B companies have struggled for years to find meaning in and reasons to engage with social media.

In a way, we in Maersk Line have somehow succeeded in paving the way for other B2B companies. Quite flattering if you think about it. And maybe stretching it a bit too far.

You can read the article Janus wrote here.